Reynolds Archives

Title

Reynolds Archives

Description

Reynolds Archives contains archival items from both Reynolds Homestead and Reynolda House Museum of American Art.

The Reynolds Homestead was built in 1843 as the Rock Spring Plantation in Critz, Virginia, by Hardin Reynolds, a successful farmer, merchant, banker, and tobacco manufacturer. Hardin and Nancy Cox Reynolds’s son, Richard Joshua (R.J.), founded the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, and their grandson, Richard Samuel, Sr., founded Reynolds Metals. The Reynolds Homestead has been designated a State and National Historic Landmark and is listed on the National Registry of American Homes.

Collection Items

Recollections of Major A.D. Reynolds
In 1916, using a partially used company ledger book, A.D. Reynolds set out to record his memoir in a series of sketches, anecdotes, and recorded memories. These sketches were written over an eight year period, between 1916 and 1924. Reynolds…

Hardin William Reynolds Account Book
Account Book for Hardin William Reynolds' general store which operated at Rock Spring Plantation documents customer purchases, including purchases made by R.J. Reynolds. Notably, African American patrons of the store are identifiable by the use of…

Zachary Smith Reynolds Log of Aeroplane NR-898W
This handwritten log kept by Z. Smith Reynolds documents his 17,000-mile solo journey from England to China from August 26, 1931 to April 5, 1932. After several false starts, Smith finally began his flight in London in December 1931, landing outside…

Reynolds Homestead
The Reynolds Homestead was built in 1843 as the Rock Spring Plantation in Critz, Virginia, by Hardin Reynolds, a successful farmer, merchant, banker, and tobacco manufacturer. Hardin and Nancy Cox Reynolds’s son, Richard Joshua (R.J.), founded the…

Donor's notecard
Donor's notecard explaining the letter written by Willie Reynolds to an anonymous girl, referred to only as “Sugar-Pie.” Typed in 1919 on a Danville and Western Railway Company letterhead, the letter appeals to the anonymous woman romantically,…

Love Letter
This is a letter written by Willie Reynolds to an anonymous girl, referred to only as “Sugar-Pie.” Typed in 1919 on a Danville and Western Railway Company letterhead, the letter appeals to the anonymous woman romantically, requesting that she write…

Katharine Smith Reynolds (1880-1924)
After marrying R.J. Reynolds in 1905, the two moved to Winston-Salem, North Carolina in 1917 and lived in an estate now known as the Reynolda House, which Mary Katharine helped design. There, she focused heavily on agriculture, and offered literacy…

Richard Joshua Reynolds (1850-1918)
Born on Rock Spring Plantation, R.J. Reynolds grew up working in his father's tobacco manufacturing business before moving to Winston-Salem, NC to begin his own company in 1874. This company, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco, grew to be a major producer of…

Nancy Susan Reynolds (1910-1985)
Daughter of R.J. and Katharine Smith, Nancy Susan Reynolds continued her parents' philanthropic ventures throughout her life. One notable example includes the donation of $500,000 and 350 acres of land from the Reynolda estate to move Wake Forest…

Kitty Reynolds
Born on October 15, 1838, Kitty was among the 88 enslaved people that lived on Rock Spring Plantation by 1863. Following the emancipation of slaves, she served as a nanny in the surrounding area, and maintained close connection with the Reynolds…

1970 dedication
It all began on June 17, 1910. A host of Reynolds family members, descendants of Hardin and Nancy Reynolds, traveled to Critz, Virginia for the dedication of Reynolds Homestead, formerly known as Rock Spring Plantation. They had been invited by Nancy…
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  • Reynolds Archives